Prizes

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Conference Poster Prize



2015 Prize Winner | Previous Winners



Rules 2016

A prize for the best poster will be awarded by the Programme Committee at the 2016 Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association and the following criteria, approved at the CPSA Board of Directors meeting of 3 Dec 2005 are used to evaluate the posters and choose a winner: visual impact, clarity and scholarly contribution. The award of a three-year membership in the CPSA (including three years of the CJPS) will be presented to the recipient at the conference.


Award Winners


2015
John R. McAndrews (University of British Columbia)
“How Do Americans React to Legislative Success and Failure?”


John R. McAndrews thanking the prize at the CPSA President’s Dinner - June 3, 2015 - Roof Top Terrace at National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

Excerpt from jury report:
This poster focuses on the reactions of the American public to congressional parties when there are legislative successes (or failures) associated with those parties. The chosen case of what McAndrews labels the ‘near death’ and then ‘resurrection’ of the 2010 Affordable Care Act covering health offers a compelling case, and the members of the jury felt the work made a scholarly contribution to the discipline’s understanding of political parties, policy, and legislatures. They also felt that the visual and creative aspects of the poster, along with the formal comments and responses to questions were of the highest quality.



2014
No posters in 2014.

2013
Cameron Anderson (Western University) and Laura Stephenson (Western University)
Political Discussion Networks and Political Activities in Canada

Excerpt from jury report:
Entitled Political Discussion Networks and Political Activities in Canada, the poster shows the results of the first survey of political attitudes in social networks conducted in Canada. And it displays surprising results. Canadians, for instance, have a low level of knowledge of the partisan preferences of the people with whom they discuss politics most, in comparison with the levels observed in the United States, where similar studies have been conducted. Anderson and Stephenson also find that disagreement discourages political discussions within social networks. The research by Anderson and Stephenson is a great contribution to knowledge on the political attitudes of Canadians.

2012
Randy Besco (Queen's University)
Voting and Visible Minority Candidates in Canada: An Experimental Investigation

Excerpt from jury report:
Randy Besco’s work analyzes the question of discrimination against visible minority candidates in Canadian elections. The findings are based on an original online experiment asking 358 undergraduate students to choose between two fictional candidates whose assumed race/ethnicity and party labels are manipulated. The surprising main finding is that perceived visible minority status did not diminish support whether or not party labels are employed, and when party labels are not employed there is actually a preference for the visible minority candidate. Besco’s work addresses why the experiment resulted in this outcome, stressing the research participants’ need for cognition.

2011
There were no poster presentations in 2011.

2010
Tamara A. Small (Mount Allison University)
Twittering Canadian Politics: A Content Analysis of Political Hashtags
Excerpt from jury report: Not available

2009
Charles Breton (University of British Columbia)
To Preserve What is Best of the Past: Network of Actors and Identity Analysis of Moral Conservatism in Canada

Excerpt from jury report:
Through the use of semi-directed interviews, Mr. Breton examines whether or not the so-called “religious right” in Canada constitutes an organized social movement. Drawing on the insights and methods of network analysis, Breton confirms the presence of what he calls a “Canadian Moral Conservatism Network.” Members of this network share a “sense of solidarity” which can be “awakened when a moral question comes to the forefront.” Members within the network, Breton finds, share both a “high intensity” and “high density” of relations. He thus concludes that the network can “be mobilized and possesses the capacity to be a movement.”

2008
James Cairns (Ryerson University)
Civic Ritual in Era of Politics-As-Usual: Newspaper Coverage of the Legislative Opening in Ontario, 1945-2007

Excerpt from jury report:
The poster examined an important question: the evolution of media coverage of a key moment in the life of Parliament, the legislative opening. The adjudication committee has been impressed by the visual presentation of the poster, the strength of its theoretical and methodological foundations, the depth of the period examined, and the relevance of its results which may help to explain citizens' evolving views about political institutions.

2007
Paul Fairie (University of Calgary)
God Only Knows: The Canadian Catholic Voter in Comparative Context


Excerpt from jury report:
The poster tackled a significant question within the Canadian political science literature and proposes a plausible explanation for an enduring puzzle. The adjudication committee believed that the poster represented a contribution to the literature and was presented in an effective poster format.

2006
Frédéric Bastien (Université de Montréal)
Stay Tuned! Infotainment and Viewers' Behaviour in Quebec

Excerpt from jury report:
Stay Tuned! Infotainment and Viewers' Behaviour in Quebec explains, in a compelling poster format, why citizens remain interested in politically informative television programs while, at the same time, the number of entertainment alternatives is increasing. Frederic Bastien provides a clear summary of data on viewer's responses to informative television programs.

CPSA Prize in International Relations


2015 Prize Winner | Previous Winners


Rules 2015

The Canadian Political Science Association announces the fourth biennial competition for the CPSA Prize in International Relations. The prize was established to recognize the contribution of Canadian political scientists to the study of international relations and to encourage the best Canadian scholarship in this field.

  • The CPSA Prize in International Relations will be awarded to the best book published, in English or in French, in the field of international relations.

  • To be eligible, a book may be single-authored or multi-authored. Textbooks, edited books, collections of essays, translations and memoirs will not be considered.

  • A book that has been submitted to the CPSA Prize in International Relations cannot be submitted to another CPSA book prize in the same year or in a subsequent year.

  • In the case of a single-authored book, the author must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. In the case of a multi-authored book, at least one of the authors must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. The membership fee, in either of the above cases, must be received at the CPSA office in Ottawa before the prize submission deadline.

  • A distinguished prize jury has been appointed by the Canadian Political Science Association, which administers the prize.

  • For the 2015 award, a book must have a copyright date of 2013 or 2014.

  • The deadline for submission of books is December 10, 2014. Books published between December 11th and December 31srt are eligible, provided that members of the jury are informed of the date of mailing.

  • The Prize winner(s) will be announced at the 2015 Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

  • The Prize winner(s) will receive a commemorative plaque. They will also receive/share the set of books submitted to the CPSA for the 2015 prize.

  • To nominate a book, a paper copy must be sent directly to each member of the Prize Jury at the addresses provided; a paper copy must also be sent directly to the offices of the CPSA. A book can be submitted by the author(s) or the publisher. Packages must be clearly marked CPSA PRIZE IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ENTRY.

CPSA Prize in International Relations Jury
Canadian Political Science Association
Suite 204, 260 Dalhousie Street
Ottawa ON Canada K1N 7E4
Telephone: 613.562.1202


Ellen Gutterman (Chair)
Department of Political Science
Glendon College, York University
2275 Bayview Avenue
TORONTO ON M4N 3M6
416.487.6735

Fiona Robinson
Department of Political Science
Carleton University
Room B640, Loeb Building
1125 Colonel By Drive - Loeb Building
OTTAWA ON K1S 5B6
613.618.6702

Jean-Philippe Thérien
Département de science politique
Université de Montréal
Pavillon Lionel-Groulx, 4e étage
3150, rue Jean-Brillant
MONTRÉAL QC H3T 1N8
Canada
514.343.6111 #20323


Award Winners


2015
Eric Helleiner
Forgotten Foundations of Bretton Woods: International Development and the Making of the Postwar Order. 2014 Ithaca ; London: Cornell University Press.


Eric Helleiner thanking the prize awarded at the CPSA President’s Dinner - June 3, 2015 - Roof Top Terrace at National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

Excerpt from the jury report:
With this work Eric Helleiner presents a major re-interpretation of the birth of the post-war order and the important place of international development at its outset. Accessing new archival resources, Helleiner persuasively demonstrates that the reconciliation of liberal multilateralism with the state-led development priorities of Southern governments was a core concern of the Bretton Woods architects. His detailed, theoretically-sophisticated analysis deftly challenges received wisdom on the roots of North-South development practices and draws previously unrecognized connections across Bretton Woods, the New International Economic Order, and the G20. Historically situated yet relevant to contemporary development policy – and written in exceptionally clear and accessible prose – Forgotten Foundations of Bretton Woods makes an outstanding scholarly contribution to the advancement of knowledge. Sure to be read by a broad audience of historians and economists as well as political scientists and others, the impact of this book will be wide-ranging.


2013
Frank P. Harvey
Explaining the Iraq War: Counterfactual Theory, Logic and Evidence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, 349 p.

Excerpt from the jury report:
Using sophisticated counterfactual arguments, Frank Harvey presents an imaginative, bold, and provocative reinterpretation of the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. Basing his analysis on a wide variety of documentary sources and other empirical evidence, he carefully and methodically challenges, and dismantles, the standard explanations for the war that overwhelmingly locate causality within the administration of George W. Bush. This book not only makes an important contribution to our understanding of the 2003 war, a conflict whose effects continue to impact global politics; more importantly, it demonstrates how path dependence and counterfactual theorizing, rigorously and imaginatively applied, can enhance our understanding of international relations.


2011
Vincent Pouliot
International Security in Practice: The Politics of NATO-Russian Diplomacy (Cambridge University Press, 2010)

Excerpt from the jury report:
With International Security in Practice, Vincent Pouliot makes significant theoretical and substantive contributions to international relations, in general, and to the study of international security, more specifically. Pouliot articulates a “logic of practicality”, building upon the work of Pierre Bourdieu to extend constructivist theorizing to develop a “theory of practice of security communities.” Pouliot’s application of theory to practice in his unraveling of the post-Cold War relations between Russia and NATO allies provides important insights to this period and serves as a prototype for scholars investigating the development of security communities in other historical and regional contexts. With an initial work of this scope and sophistication, Pouliot has established himself at the forefront of his field.


2009
Alain Noël and Jean-Philippe Thérien
Left and Right in Global Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2008)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Noël and Thérien make a provocative and stimulating case for taking the left-right divide seriously in the study of world politics. The authors provide a rich historical analysis of how left-right politics has played out in international history, and draw on extensive comparative empirical data to highlight its centrality in contemporary debates about global poverty and development, as well as on subjects such as the politics of identity, the war on terror, and global environmental concerns. Instead of devising a new conceptual framework for analyzing international politics, the authors cogently demonstrate the enduring power of an old dichotomy centred on universal contestations over the meaning of equality. This book also refreshingly reminds scholars of the need to be more transparent about the partisan nature of political debates, including those among scholars, and to be more appreciative of how the left-right division makes global politics intelligible, clarifying what is at stake, and what is held in common in global disagreements. It is a rare book indeed which offers so much to such a wide range of students and scholars, at all levels of their academic careers.

Vincent Lemieux Prize


2015 Prize Winner | Previous Winners


Rules 2015



PUL LogoThe Canadian Political Science Association announces the ninth biennial competition for the Vincent Lemieux Prize. The CPSA will award the prize, named after the eminent political scientist Professor Vincent Lemieux of the Université Laval, to the author of the best PhD thesis submitted at a Canadian institution, in 2013 or 2014, in English or in French, in any sub-field of political science. The Vincent Lemieux Prize is made possible thanks to the financial support of Les Presses de l’Université Laval.



  • The Vincent Lemieux Prize will be awarded to the best thesis in any sub-field of political science, written in English or in French, judged eminently worthy of publication in the form of a book or articles.

  • A thesis is eligible only after nomination by the unit in which it was defended. A unit in which five or fewer theses were defended in the two-year period may nominate one candidate. If six to ten were defended in the same period, two may be nominated. For those units with more than ten completed PhDs, three thesis may be nominated. Units of political science, public policy, international affairs or related fields at Canadian institutions are eligible to submit theses provided that they hold a CPSA institutional membership. In the case of interdisciplinary units, only political science theses defended in the two-year period may count toward a unit’s total nomination allotment.

  • A distinguished prize jury will be appointed by the Canadian Political Science Association, which administers the prize.

  • For the 2015 award, a thesis must have been defended in 2013 or 2014.

  • The deadline for submission of the copies of the theses is 15 February 2015.

  • The Prize winner will be announced at the 2015 Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

  • The Prize winner will receive a commemorative certificate and a cheque in the amount of $1000.

  • Unit chairs are invited to mail one copy of each thesis submitted for adjudication directly to each member of the Prize Jury and the office of the CPSA at the addresses provided below. Packages must be clearly marked VINCENT LEMIEUX PRIZE ENTRY.

Vincent Lemieux Prize Jury
Canadian Political Science Association
Suite 204, 260 Dalhousie Street
Ottawa Ontario K1N 7E4
Telephone: 613.562.1202

Antoine Bilodeau
Department of Political Science
Concordia University
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West
Montréal Québec H3G 1M8
514.848.2424 #5067

Rianne Mahon
245 5th Ave
Ottawa Ontario K1S 2N1
613.797.4487

François Rocher (Chair)
School of Political Studies
University of Ottawa
120 University
Room 7005
Ottawa Ontario K1N 6N5
613.562.5800 #5865

Past Award Winners


2015
Paul May
Individual rights and redefining secularism: the case of religious arbitration courts in Ontario - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (Paris), and UQAM (Montréal).


Paul May thanking the prize awarded at the CPSA President’s Dinner - June 3, 2015 - Roof Top Terrace at National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

Excerpt from the jury report:
This thesis reflects an approach that is both philosophical and sociological. In the first section, after a broad review of the historical foundations of the process of secularization in the West (and in Canada), it offers a critical, comprehensive and detailed analysis of the "recognition" philosophers (Taylor, Parekh and Kymlicka) as a function of the way in which they articulate the rights of individuals and those of religious groups in their respective theories of multiculturalism. In the second section, it examines the controversy that arose in connection with the creation of religious arbitration courts. The analysis is based on a detailed study of the controversy involving Islam in this context and the identity debates it sustained, influenced by a current of Islamophobia, the essentialization of sharia through an orientalist vision of the Moslem religion, criticisms of multiculturalism and an appeal to the principles of secularization as an identity marker in opposition to Islam. It notes the mobilization of the social stakeholders and their positions between individual rights and the delegation of rights to religious groups. The arguments they propose are faithfully and meticulously examined and confronted with the political science, anthropology and sociology literature. This is a remarkably rich thesis, because of its theoretical depth as well as the power of its empirical analysis. The issue of secularization is discussed in the light of various currents of thought within liberalism. His analysis of the debates that surrounded the Boyd report on religious arbitration tribunals in Ontario shows that the real debate is less about individual rights than about the place of Islam within Canadian society, the extreme fragmentation of positions expressed by Moslems, especially the mobilization of Moslems themselves. Finally, it proposes an enlightening reflection on how to reconcile the principles of secularism with the necessary recognition of religious pluralism.


2013
Gabriel Eidelman (University of Toronto)
Landlocked: Politics, Property, and the Toronto Waterfront, 1960-2000

Excerpt from the jury report:
This is a dissertation of urban politics on the development of Toronto’s waterfront. The thesis is a fine case study in multilevel governance and it is counter-intuitive in its analysis and outcomes. Based on international experiences, the presence of strong public ownership should facilitate urban renewal projects. The opposite is occurring in Toronto. Rather than creating innovative solutions in a network setting, multi-level governance produces entangled responsibilities and joint-decision traps. The thesis stands out for being pithy and succinct, both in the presentation of its data and the subsequent analysis. It features multiple interviews, rich archival research and the use of geospatial data. Beyond urban politics, this dissertation enriches the policy implementation literature. It also exemplifies scholarship of Canadian governance and how a Canadian case study can inform a broad body of international literature on both the level of theory and policy.


2011
Netina Tan (University of British Columbia)
Access to Power: Hegemonic Party Rule In Singapore and Taiwan

Excerpt from the jury report:
Natina Clara Tan asks the question why Singapore’s People’s Action Party has been successful in maintaining its hegemonic rule while Taiwan’s Kuomintang has yielded to the forces of democratization. She makes a compelling argument for the importance of elite cohesion and strategic coordination of public goods and the restriction of political and civil liberties as the key variables in establishing and maintaining a hegemonic party system. Tan builds her analytical model through a combination of the historical institutional perspective and a carefully constructed comparative analysis. Using a mix of interviews, survey data and historical narrative, Tan offers a detailed examination of the decisions, practices and circumstances which have shaped the course of both parties. She has provided an insightful and provocative examination of the importance of party organization elite succession in either promoting or forestalling democratization. Her conclusion – that intra-party democracy has a deleterious impact on party cohesion – has applicability beyond the particular circumstances the two case studies.

2009
Vincent Pouliot (University of Toronto)
Security Community In and Through Practice: The Power Politics of Russian-NATO Diplomacy

Excerpt from the jury report:
Vincent Pouliot’s dissertation is impressive on multiple levels. It draws on a broad range of theories in fields ranging from international relations to the sociology of knowledge. It is based on highly detailed research, including interviews in North America, Western Europe, and Russia. It is elegantly written. The empirical analysis of the post-Cold War evolution of Russia-NATO relations is highly convincing. Most importantly, the dissertation is highly innovative theoretically. It breaks new theoretical ground in an analysis of security communities without prior collective identity formation, as well as in a sophisticated account of the priority of practical knowledge and habitus to consequentialist and normative reasoning. Overall, the author makes major methodological advances in constructivist theory and international relations generally, including developing the method of “subjectivism” to interpret the behaviour of (international) actors.

2007
Ellen Gutterman (University of Toronto)
On Corruption and Compliance: Explaining State Compliance with the 1997 OECD Anti-Bribery Convention

Excerpt from the jury report:
Gutterman's thesis provides a compelling analysis of why states choose to comply or not comply with important international norms and agreements, through a comparative analysis of the response of four relatively similar states (the United States, Germany, France, and the UK) to the OECD's 1997 Anti-Bribery Convention. She provides a novel theoretical interpretation of the puzzle of(non)compliance, focusing on non-materialist considerations concerning the way in which an international norm is articulated within particular domestic political and normative contexts. Her theoretical ideas are well supported by richly textured comparative case studies. Gutterman's combination of theoretical and methodological sophistication, excellent case-based analysis,and clear and compelling presentation mark this out as a particularly outstanding thesis in an area of great interest and importance within the field of international relations.

2005
Steven Lecce (University of Western Ontario)
Liberal Equality: A Contractual Defence

Excerpt from the jury report:
Lecce’s thesis attempts to rescue liberal pluralism, and thereby liberal democracy, from “perfectionists” who would privilege certain interests and values over others. The thesis is admirable for its lucid writing, thorough and careful analysis, and original contribution to the continuing debate over liberalism. It also offers an excellent overview of the history of liberal thought, by examining three seminal debates: Locke vs. Proast, Mill vs. Stephen, and Hart vs. Devlin. The argument in favour of ethical neutrality in the public sphere is particularly thought-provoking for Canadians, who live in an unusually diverse yet peaceful society.

2003
Cornelius Chipoma (University of Toronto)
Beyond Participation: Mapping the Institutional Dimensions of Collective Action in Zambia

Excerpt from the jury report:
The Chipoma dissertation on collective action in Zambia is intellectually rich, and is developed out of extensive field research. The amount of field research done by Chipoma is truly remarkable and worthy of distinction. The author provides a strong theoretical justification for his selection of cases, and provides detailed treatment of theoretical perspectives on empowerment, institutional analysis and social capital, making an original theoretical contribution through the concept of "political capital". The case studies demonstrate the crucial role that leadership plays in collective action. The dissertation was audacious in its scope and execution, and has significant implications for the way aid programs are administered and implemented.

2003
Martin Horak (University of Toronto)
Institutional Change and Post-Communist Government Performance

Excerpt from the jury report:
The Horak thesis on post-communist government performance is a model for a dissertation in comparative politics. In addressing this extremely important subject, he provides a convincing theoretical argument justifying a middle ground between the "structure of the state" and "post-communist legacy" perspectives on effective democratic governance. The case studies are well-chosen in that they maximize leverage from the study of governance in a single city. The author makes good use of interview material and provides one of the best analyses drawing out implications for other research in his conclusions.

2001
Elizabeth Louise Moore (University of Toronto)
Science, Internationalization and Policy Networks: Regulating Genetically-Engineered Food Crops in Canada and the United States, 1973-1998

Excerpt from the jury report:
A well-written, state-of the art discussion of an important policy issue and topic. Leading edge concepts applied carefully to a complex case study. The strength of this thesis lies in the clarity of its presentation. The comparative dimension is strong and informative. The historical chronology and policy adaptations are expertly handled. The material is complex but unobtrusively incorporated into political analysis. The sources are unimpeachable.

1999
Jean-Rodrigue Paré (Queen's University)
La nation, la culture et la science. Les visages de l'engagement dans l'oeuvre de Max Weber

Excerpt from the jury report:
This thesis, which discusses commitment in Max Weber’s work, offers a very exciting reading of Weber’s contribution from an unusual angle. The author essentially emphasizes the connections between political commitment and science in Weber’s work and emphasizes the fact that these two aspects mutually support each other. In support of this thesis, Jean-Rodrigue Paré returns to the writings of the young Weber, which suggested that science must be used to serve the nation. Then, at the turn of the century, Weber focused his work on the philosophy of commitment, which ultimately results in the sociology of rational action, based on the normative nature of logical consequence as a condition for effective commitment.

The jury felt that the author develops a careful analysis of the progression of Weber’s work, in relation to the subject and its inclusion in the social and political environment. The arguments are methodical and strong and the author demonstrates excellent knowledge of the work and a highly developed analytical ability applied to the history of ideas. The author shows that he has a very good comprehension of at least three languages. This publication is a solid contribution to the history of ideas and its quality is evident. The jury notes that there are very few studies of political philosophy and is proud to encourage work in that area. This award-winning thesis is special in that it was written in French at an English-language university. The jury congratulates the author for the innovative character of his analysis and the suitability of his work for publication in a book.

John McMenemy Prize


2015 Prize Winner | Previous Winners


Rules 2016

The Canadian Political Science Association and the Société québécoise de science politique proudly announce the sixteenth annual competition for the John McMenemy Prize. The certificate of award will be made to the author or authors of the best article, in English or French, published in volume 48 of the Canadian Journal of Political Science. The recipient (or recipients) of the prize will also be awarded five 2017 memberships in the Canadian Political Science Association and the Société québécoise de science politique to be distributed to five students.

The prize was established in honour of the former Journal's Administrative Editor, Professor John McMenemy of Wilfrid Laurier University, who between 1977 and 2004, contributed greatly to the success of the Association and the Société's flagship journal. The Canadian Journal of Political Science, a quarterly journal of the highest international standards, is distributed to approximately 2000 scholars and institutions around the world.

The annual jury will normally consist of the two co-editors of the Journal and one member of the CPSA Board of Directors.

The prize recipient will be announced at the 2016 Annual Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

2016 Prize Jury Members:
Jean-François Godbout (Montréal, Co-editor)
Peter Loewen (Toronto, Assistant Editor)
Fiona MacDonald (Fraser Valley, Board member)


Award Winners


2015
Jerald Sabin
"Contested Colonialism: Responsible Government and Political Development in Yukon." 47(02): 375-396



Jerald Sabin thanking the prize awarded at the CPSA President’s Dinner - June 3, 2015 - Roof Top Terrace at National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

Excerpt from jury report:
Sabin’s paper draws from settler colonial literature to examine the unique historical case of the settler political movement in the Yukon and its demands for responsible government. Drawing from this literature, Sabin proposes a ‘contested colonialism’ framework in order to bring to light how settler movements in the 1960s and 1970s were able to exploit their dual status as colonizers and colonized in their demands for responsible government for the Yukon. Making use of discursive, structural, and political opportunities, leaders of the non-indigenous settler population used this status not only to mobilize against the federal government, but also to oppose the land claims of Indigenous peoples. Rather than limit the analysis to an exploration of the relationship between Indigenous peoples, the Crown, and the federal government, Sabin advances the case, in highly convincing terms, that we need to explore more carefully the role played by settler movements and the influence they exerted over the political processes in northern Canada in order to fully understand the marginalization of Indigenous peoples.


2014
Paul Saurette (University of Ottawa) and Kelly Gordon (University of Ottawa)
Arguing Abortion: The New Anti-Abortion Discourse in Canada
Canadian Journal of Political Science 46:1

Excerpt from jury report:
The nature of contemporary anti-abortion discourse in Canada is the topic of this original and fascinating analysis by Paul Saurette and Kelly Gordon. Using both quantitative and qualitative analysis, Saurette and Gordon demonstrate that there is a new anti-abortion rhetoric changing our Canadian cultural landscape. The research moves far beyond traditional accounts providing evidence that the new discourse frames abortion as anti-woman thus supplanting traditional fetal personhood perspectives. This paper would find a home on a number of syllabi, in courses on media and politics, women and law, gender studies and public policy and it substantively changes our understanding of how anti-abortion lobbyists are operating in this contentious policy field.


2013
Frank P. Harvey (Dalhousie University)
President Al Gore and the 2003 Iraq War: A Counterfactual Test of Conventional 'W'isdom
Canadian Journal of Political Science 45:1

Excerpt from jury report:
A remarkable example of counterfactual analysis examining the validity of widely held political interpretations and deepening our theoretical understanding of crucial decisions. Harvey rigorously examines the all but universal acceptance of what he terms ‘neoconism’ – that the Bush administration’s decision to go to war in Iraq in 2003 was a function of its ideological agenda, misguided priorities, intentional deceptions and grand strategies. Relying on a wide range of data sources, Harvey builds a strong case that had Al Gore won the 2002 Presidential election, he would have reacted to the Iraq situation in much the same fashion as did George W. Bush. Whatever one’s view of the Bush administration and the Iraq war, this incisive analysis cannot be ignored.


2012
Fiona MacDonald (University of Manitoba)
Indigenous Peoples and Neoliberal ‘Privatization’ in Canada: Opportunities, Cautions and Constraints
Canadian Journal of Political Science 44:2

Excerpt from jury report:
In this innovative study, MacDonald explores the significant challenges of Indigeneous governance in light of growing demands for justice and progressive change. Arguing that state responses to Indigenous demands are now framed within a neoliberal context, MacDonald contends that this approach is highly regressive and unlikely to result in truly transformative change. Neoliberalism is suggested to shift social policy from a holistic, capacity-building exercise for Aboriginal governance to a significantly narrower terrain that is counter-productive for Indigenous autonomy. Using narrative and discourse analysis and the case of child welfare devolution in Manitoba, MacDonald contends that neoliberalism, because it shifts contentious issues out of the public sphere and limits collective dialogue, is counter-productive for facilitating just Indigenous-state relations.


2011
Antoine Bilodeau (Concordia University), Stephen White (University of Regina) and Neil Nevitte (University of Toronto)
The Development of Dual Loyalties: Immigrants’ Integration to Canadian Regional Dynamics
Canadian Journal of Political Science 43:3

Excerpt from jury report:
This article examines an extremely important and topical issue in Canadian politics; the interplay between regionalism, dual loyalties and immigration. The authors find that new immigrants tend to develop more federally oriented loyalties than the local population of the province, although in Quebec this relationship is shaped by the immigrants’ linguistic choice. This is yet another excellent article that commands impressive empirical support for a thought-provoking major question that is so central to the study and understanding of Canadian political life. A major strength of this article, compared with other recent publications on similar topics, is that it does not shy away from the complex dimensions making data analysis more difficult. A second major strength is that their work breaks new ground in showing the original situation of Québec with regards to the dual loyalties of immigrants.


2010
Matthew Kerby (Memorial University of Newfoundland)
Worth the Wait: Determinants of Ministerial Appointments in Canada, 1935 - 2008
Canadian Journal of Political Science 42:3

Excerpt from jury report:
Kerby's study of the determinants of appointment to the federal cabinet is refreshing and timely. The article is based on an original dataset, is methodologically sophisticated, and the treatment makes the Canadian case truly comparable. It provides the first formalized assessment of the relative impact of such factors as gender, age, education, length of tenure in parliament and in cabinet, margin of victory, and region on the likelihood of an MP being appointed to cabinet. Clearly written, with technical information presented in an accessible manner, this important and original contribution opens a new chapter in the study of this core political institution.


2009
Debra Elizabeth Thompson (University of Toronto)
Is Race Political?
Canadian Journal of Political Science 41:3

Excerpt from jury report:
Debra Thompson's outstanding paper "Is Race Political?" (CJPS, 41/3, September 2008,525-547) is the first text about race in political science the Journal has published since Vince Wilson's Presidential Address in 1993. Thompson argues that this reflects a 'fundamental disconnect' between 'Canadian demographic and social reality, which demonstrates the significance of race, and the disciplinary silence of English-Canadian political science regarding both the conceptualization of race as a political production and the incorporation of race as a compelling explanatory variable in the analysis of political pheomena'(525).

Thompson briefly demonstrates the political nature of race in Canada, and then explores tentative explanations for the scarcity of literature on race in political science compared to the other social sciences. Many English-Canadians still consider race a problem which stops at the Canada-US border, and Thompson concludes that the appearance of race as a descriptor in only 1.6% of articles in three major English-Canadian political science journals is 'shamefully low'. But her analysis also takes seriously the difficulties identified by earlier English-Canadian scholars in finding 'space' for race analysis in our main theoretical frameworks. One problem is the focus of these frameworks on political elites and decision makers, few of whom have been other than white men. Another is the discipline's historic focus on politics in Canada, with suprisingly little work on the United States.

Thompson's text also provides suggestions for how the politics of race can be conceptualized to take its place beside familiar themes--e.g. Quebec and Aboriginal nationalisms, multiculturalism. Rejecting colour-blind approaches, because they erase racial minorities by focusing only on elite actors, Thompson argues that the discipline must reconsider its commitment to elite-focused, colour-blind approaches. She argues that the other social sciences have incorporated issues and ideas about race more fully precisely because they focus on mass as well as elite phenomena, and explore global trends. Thompson also suggests that exploring how francophone political scientists in Canada have dealt with racial issues may be fruitful--a suggestion which could link us in a common project. This is a challenging, provocative and useful text.


2008
Amanda Bittner (Memorial University of Newfoundland)
The Effects of Information and Social Cleavages: Explaining Issue Attitudes and Vote Choice in Canada
Canadian Journal of Political Science 40:4

Excerpt from jury report:
This article tackles an important and enduring question of Canadian politics in a theoretically and methodologically sophisticated manner. In seeking to understand the interaction of social group identity and depth of political knowledge Bittner demonstrates that group linkages are less important in determining both attitudes and vote choice than had been previously thought and she explores the complex relationship between social groups, information and public opinion. Clearly written and presented, the article goes beyond highly technical analysis of narrow questions to make a significant contribution to the understanding of Canadian political behaviour.

2007
Pascale Dufour (Université de Montréal)
Projet national et espace de protestation mondiale: des articulations distinctes au Québec et au Canada
Canadian Journal of Political Science 39:2

Excerpt from jury report:
Dufour’s article offers significant a contribution not only to the study of political differences between Quebec and Canada but also to the broader concern with the ways in which sociopolitical actors pursue national projects in the context of globalization. Dufour both challenges and complements previous research on the effects of globalization on Québec politics by arguing that the institutionalized collaboration between a majority of social actors and the Parti québécois until the early 2000s was a key explanatory factor to account for the Canada-Québec differences during this period. The article is a tour de force of methodological pluralism: it relies on textual analysis of primary sources and newspapers as well semi-structured interviews with political and social actors.

2006
Michael M. Atkinson (University of Saskatchewan) and Gerald Bierling (McMaster University)
Politicians, the Public and Political Ethics: Worlds Apart
Canadian Journal of Political Science 38:4

Excerpt from jury report:
The authors address a timely topic in contemporary Canadian politics - the regulation of political ethics. By demonstrating the gap between public opinion and the opinions of political elites on ethical questions, the authors call into doubt the recent vogue for increased ethics regulation. Marked by sophisticated analysis and an accessible conceptualization of different models of political ethics regulation, the article makes a critical contribution to a live issue in Canadian political life.

2005
Godson Dinneya (Rhodes University) and Asrat Tsegaye (University of Fort Hare)
Constructing a Cardinal Measure of Democratic Development in a Transitional Polity: The Nigerian Example
Canadian Journal of Political Science 37:2

Excerpt from jury report:
The authors present a convincing critique of the major methods of measuring democratic development and suggest that focusing on the subject as a process rather than an outcome better captures its nuance and reality. The new measure is then tested in the case of Nigeria and this demonstrates its enhanced sensitivity to transition polities. This cogent paper constitutes an important contribution in the areas of democratization studies, comparative politics and political methodology.

2005
Stuart Soroka (McGill University) and Christopher Wlezien (University of Oxford)
Opinion Representation and Policy Feedback: Canada in Comparative Perspective
Canadian Journal of Political Science 37:3

Excerpt from jury report:
The authors focus on examining the correspondence between public opinion and policy behaviour in Canada. Employing a “thermostatic” model of opinion and policy with respect to budgetary expenditure, the analysis finds that the public notices, and responds to, changes in public spending. Policymakers, moreover, represent these policy preferences. The Canadian findings are considered in light of similar studies conducted in the United States and Great Britain. The study makes a clear contribution to the fields of Canadian politics, comparative politics and public policy.

2004
Joanne Boucher (University of Winnipeg)
Male Power and Contract Theory: Hobbes and Locke in Carole Pateman’s The Sexual Contract
Canadian Journal of Political Science 36:1

Excerpt from jury report:
In “Male Power and Contract Theory: Hobbes and Locke in Carole Pateman’s The Sexual Contract”, Joanne Boucher critically analyzes Carole Pateman’s novel and provocative reading of classical social contract theory. While providing an insightful exposition and assessment of Pateman’s gendered overview of social contract theory found in the writings of Hobbes and Locke, Joanne offers a nuanced critique of Pateman’s work, highlighting certain of the difficulties of viewing contract theory through the lens of a sexual contract. Joanne’s work also advances contemporary social contract theory, suggesting lines of inquiry designed to probe power relations between individuals, genders, classes, and communities.

2003
Michael Orsini (Glendon College, York University)
The Politics of Naming, Blaming and Claiming: HIV, Hepatitis C and the Emergence of Blood Activism in Canada
Canadian Journal of Political Science, 35:3

2002
Laura Janara (University of Western Ontario)
Democracy's Family Values: Alexis de Tocqueville on Anxiety, Fear and Desire
Canadian Journal of Political Science, 34:3

2001
Steven Bernstein (University of Toronto) and Benjamin Cashore (Auburn University)
Globalization, Four Paths of Internationalization and Domestic Policy Change: The Case of EcoForestry in British Columbia, Canada
Canadian Journal of Political Science, 33:1

Donald Smiley Prize



2015 Prize Winner | Previous Winners



Rules 2016

The Canadian Political Science Association announces the twenty-first competition for the Donald Smiley Prize. The prize was established to honour the life and work of Donald V. Smiley (1921-1990) and to encourage the ideals of scholarship represented by this great Canadian political scientist. An internationally renowned professor of Canadian government and politics and later Professor Emeritus at York University, Professor Smiley served as President of the Canadian Political Science Association.


  • The CPSA will award the Donald Smiley Prize to the best book published in English or in French in the field relating to the study of government and politics in Canada.

  • Eligible books may be single-authored or multi-authored; textbooks, edited books, collections of essays, translations and memoirs are not eligible.

  • A book that has been submitted to the Donald Smiley Prize cannot be submitted to another CPSA book prize in the same year or in a subsequent year.

  • In the case of a single-authored book, the author must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. In the case of a multi-authored book, at least one of the authors must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. The membership fee, in either of the above cases, must be received at the CPSA office in Ottawa before the prize submission deadline.

  • For the 2016 award, a book must have a copyright date of 2015.

  • The deadline for submission of books is 17 December 2015. Books published between December 18th and December 31srt are eligible, provided that members of the jury are informed of the date of mailing.

  • The Prize winner(s) will be announced at the 2016 Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

  • The Prize winner(s) will receive a commemorative plaque. They will also receive/share the set of books submitted to the CPSA office for the 2016 prize.

  • To nominate a book, a paper copy must be sent directly to each member of the Prize Jury at the addresses provided; a paper copy must also be sent directly to the offices of the CPSA. A book can be submitted by the author(s) or the publisher. Packages must be clearly marked DONALD SMILEY PRIZE ENTRY.

Donald Smiley Prize Jury
Canadian Political Science Association
Suite 204, 260 Dalhousie Street
Ottawa Ontario K1N 7E4
Canada
613.562.1202


Paul Howe
Department of Political Science
Tilley Hall, Room 219
9 Macaulay Lane
University of New Brunswick
Fredericton New Brunswick E3B 5A3
Canada
506-453-4826

Lori Turnbull
Privy Council Office
59 Sparks Street
Ottawa Ontario K1A 0A3
Canada
613-948-6605

Marie-Joelle Zahar
Département de science politique
Université de Montréal
3150 Jean-Brillant, 4e étage, bureau C-4006
Montréal Québec H3T 1N8
Canada
514-258-1583


Award Winners


2015
Bruce Smardon
Asleep at the Switch: The Political Economy of Federal Research and Development Policy since 1960, McGill-Queen’s University Press


Bruce Smardon thanking the prize awarded at the CPSA President’s Dinner - June 3, 2015 - Roof Top Terrace at National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

Excerpt from jury report:
This is a detailed investigation of the policy failure of federal Research and Development policy in the post 1960 period. The origins of this failure lie in the first decade of the twentieth century with the development by the Canadian private sector of a technological dependence on US companies. In the post 1960’s period this leads to a systematic mismatch between the growing body of research being done in the universities and a poorly developed set of innovative capacity in the private sector. To quote the author “Canada’s failure to create more innovative economy was the lack of collaboration by capital.”


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2014
G. Bruce Doern, Allan M. Maslove and Michal J. Prince
Canadian Public Budgeting in the Age of Crises. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2013.

Excerpt from jury report:
Doern, Maslove and Prince’s book deals with a topic of broad and current interest. Doern and colleagues begin their book with an argument that scholars of Canadian public policy need (a) a deeper understanding of budgetary domains, (b) a better way of defining and thinking about fiscal crisis, and (c) an increasing focus on the temporal dimension of budgetary decision-making. The book provides all this, by first reviewing thirty years of fiscal climate, macroeconomic policy and budgetary institutions; and then in detailed reviews of different policy domains. What is most striking about this book is the magnitude of the endeavor – the book manages to combine a rich theoretical background with a very thorough account of recent budgetary trends. It also places budget crises in comparative context, and examines the Canadian-specific elements that have made them better or worse. This is a meticulous but also far-reaching analysis of Canadian budgetary policy.


2013
William P. Cross, and André Blais
Politics at the Centre: The Selection and Removal of Party Leaders in the Anglo Parliamentary Democracies. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

Excerpt from jury report:
Politics at the Centre: The Selection and Removal of Party Leaders in the Anglo Parliamentary Democracies provides an impressive explanation of how Canada’s national political leaders attain the apex of their party’s power structure, how they remain in power, and how they can be deposed. The rules, norms and practices that shape the institutional context for entering and leaving party leadership are brought into clear focus through comparative analysis that spans 25 political parties in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. By investigating leadership campaigns in these parties over four decades, the authors are able to contrast how selection is becoming more democratic in some parties, with growing input from rank and file members, while remaining the preserve of party elites and the parliamentary caucus in other cases. Not only does the book’s framework enable greater insight of where Canadian parties are heading in their leadership selection and de-selection practices, but it is also likely to increase the understanding of Canadian politics in the parliamentary democracies whose parties have been compared with experience in Canada.


2012
Peter Aucoin, Mark. D. Jarvis and Lori Turnbull
Democratizing the Constitution. Reforming Responsible Government in Canada (Toronto: Emond Montgomery Publications, 2011)

Excerpt from jury report:
Democratizing the Constitution is an incisive analysis of the state of responsible government in Canada. The authors argue that the nature of the relationship between the Canadian Prime Minister and the House of Commons presents a democratic problem because of the control of the former over the latter. This problem, according to the authors, has both constitutional and a parliamentary government dimensions. Constitutionally, the book suggests the problem resides in the capacity of the Prime Minister to abuse the position’s powers to summon, prorogue, and dissolve the House. With respect to parliamentary government, the authors argue that rules and procedures that allow the Prime Minister to manage the business of the House have been put at the service of controlling the legislative branch in Canada. Democratizing the Constitution offers its analysis with an eye towards change as it puts forth a four-part proposal for constitutional reform.


2012
Raymond Hudon and Christian Poirier
La Politique, jeux et enjeux. Action en société, action publique, et pratiques démocratiques (Presses de l’Université Laval, 2011)

Excerpt from jury report:
In this book, the authors present an entirely original analysis of the state of contemporary politics. Based on a comprehensive and nuanced synthesis of writings about political activity, their analysis rejects the thesis of a decline in politics and instead makes a brilliant case for political renewal and democratic practices. In short, this book by Raymond Hudon and Christian Poirier is a timely and vital source for political analysts as well as citizens with an interest in politics.


2011
Paul Howe
Citizens Adrift: The Democratic Disengagement of Young Canadians (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2010)

Excerpt from jury report:
In Citizens Adrift, Paul Howe explores a problem that every political scientist in Canada has to be thinking about: Why are younger people less interested in politics than their elders? Howe comes to the topic with an open mind, an infectious enthusiasm, and an impressive toolkit. Drawing on the research of others, generating new data of his own, and comparing Canadian results with similar countries, he examines the issue of disengagement from a number of fascinating angles. His diagnosis is at once wise, persuasive, and troubling; his prescriptions are realistic and achievable. Citizens Adrift is a model of political science that deserves a place on every scholar’s reference table not just because it is accessible and intelligent, but because it will inform reflection and discussion both in class and, one hopes, on the street.


2011
Frédérick Boily
Le conservatisme au Québec: Retour sur une tradition oubliée (Québec: Presses de l’Université Laval, 2010)

Excerpt from jury report:
In this work, Frédéric Boily develops the relatively innovative argument that while social democracy has become a accepted ideology in Québec since the Quiet Revolution, the conservative tradition is still present. Boily makes an original comparison of conservatism in Québec, Canada and the United States. He offers a detailed portrait of a province with a rich conservative history that continues to shape its political institutions and social changes. The author has produced a lucid and very well written work that should change the way we understand Quebec and Canadian politics.


2010
Kristin Good
Municipalities and Multiculturalism (Toronto: The University of Toronto Press, 2009)

Excerpt from jury report:
This book will contribute to a renewal of urban policy studies in Canada. By combining a critical questioning of multiculturalism with an in-depth examination of integration and accommodation policies in eight communities in two major Canadian metropolitan areas, Kristin Good establishes the basis for a new field of research and reflection, one in which generally accepted ideas on local democracy, skill sharing and social change are shattered. Her approach relies on a well-developed theoretical framework that allows the author to reveal the profound effect of the demographic and cultural transformations that accompany mass immigration. The effective structure of this well-documented, well-written work predisposes it to be quickly embraced as a course textbook on local politics, but will also find a wide readership among all who are interested in the question of immigration. Kristin R. Good is Assistant Professor with the Department of Political Science at Dalhousie University.


2010
Éric Bélanger and Richard Nadeau
Le Comportement électoral des Québécois (Montréal (QC), Presses de l’Université de Montréal)

Excerpt from jury report:
This work brilliantly revives a tradition of empirical research once prevalent in Quebec political science. With a rigorous and direct style the two authors attempt to provide "avenues of explanation and analysis" illuminating fluctuations in Quebecers' electoral behaviour. Relying on 2007 and 2008 election results and an empirical model drawn from a highly sophisticated original survey, Bélanger and Nadeau draw clear and convincing conclusions about the political and ideological determinants of the vote. Their interpretation of the electoral effects of the debate on the national question and the role of government will undoubtedly influence the political parties and their strategies in the years ahead. More broadly, this book should be mandatory reading for all political commentators in Quebec, who will thereby avoid much misinterpretation – particularly with regard to the ADQ and the party system. Éric Bélanger is Assistant Professor with the Department of Political Science at McGill University; Richard Nadeau is Professor of Politcal science with the University of Montreal.


2009
Gerard W. Boychuk
National Health Insurance in the United States and Canada. Race, Territory and the Roots of Difference, (Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2008)

Excerpt from jury report:
In this clear, thorough and accessible essay, Gerard Boychuk proposes a thought-provoking explanation of the divergent paths Canada and the United States have taken with respect to the financing and management of public health care. Moving away from the well established views according to which political culture, institutional configuration or path dependency account for the differences between the two countries, Boychuk emphasizes factors seldom considered by other specialists of health care policy and argues that the politics of territorial integration in Canada and race relations in the United States provide a more compelling explanation for the different history and development of public health care in the two countries. This book offers an inspiring illustration of the comparative turn scholars of Canadian politics are increasingly taking and is bound to become an essential reference in the field.

Gerard Boychuk is director of global governance at the Balsillie School of International Affairs and an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo. He is also a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Policy Research at the University of Calgary.


2009
Christian Jetté
Les organismes communautaires et la transformation de l’État-providence. Trois décennies de coconstruction des politiques publiques dans le domaine de la santé et des services sociaux, (Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2008)

Excerpt from jury report:
This meticulously documented work, filled with much previously overlooked detail, tells the story of the relations between community health and social services organizations and the Quebec government since the early 1970s. Christian Jetté clarifies the central role played by Quebec community organizations in developing social and health policy. He makes an extremely convincing contribution to our understanding of the process by which the welfare state was formed and transformed in Quebec. His reading of the facts and events involved in the formulation of government health care and social services policy forces us to reconsider the explanations accepted until now of the nature of the Quebec state and the interface between government and Quebec civil society. This is a book that will permanently affect our views of the socio-political dynamic in contemporary Québec.

Christian Jetté is a professor at the École de service social of the Université de Montréal and co-director of LAREPPS, its social practice and policy research laboratory.


2008
Douglas Macdonald (University of Toronto)
Business and Environmental Politics in Canada (Broadview Press, 2007)

Excerpt from jury report:
Macdonald’s book is well-written, accessible, concise, and one of the most outstanding studies of public policy in Canada to appear in recent years. Surveying the whole history of environmental politics in Canada over the last half century, it presents and tests a number of hypotheses about the role of business in the formation of policy in this area. Examining a number of case studies ranging from the controversy over acid rain to the regulation of beverage containers in Ontario, it concludes that business corporations essentially reacted, although not without success, to changes in the political agenda and that they were as much concerned with their legitimacy and “image” as with their balance sheets. Its judgements and conclusions are balanced and firmly based on the evidence, and its analysis will be appreciated not only by students of Canadian environmental politics but by anyone interested in the relationship between business and the state in industrialized liberal democracies.


2007
Garth Stevenson (Brock University)
Parallel Paths: The Development of Nationalism in Ireland and Quebec (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2006)

Excerpt from jury report:
Parallel Paths is an intellectually bold foray into the history of nationalism in Ireland and Quebec. Garth Stevenson’s thoughtful and systematic comparison of the development of these two societies from their origins as rebels within the British Empire, yields rich insights into the study of nationalism as well as the present political choices facing the two nations. Stevenson illuminates the effect that Quebec’s early achievement of self-government within the Canadian federation had on its later pursuit of independence in contrast with Ireland’s failure to secure home rule within the United Kingdom and its more volatile struggle for independence culminating in partition. By looking back, he captures the current dilemma facing Quebec and Ireland as they struggle to balance their historical national identities with more inclusive civic nationalities. Stevenson concludes that nationalism is a powerful, positive force in achieving the goals of political and social justice and tempering the effects of economic globalization and mass migration provided that it indulges neither xenophobic intolerance nor mindless diversification.


2006
Gregory Inwood (Ryerson University)
Continentalizing Canada: The Politics and Legacy of the Macdonald Royal Commission (University of Toronto Press, 2005)

Excerpt from jury report:
Continentalizing Canada provides an original, comprehensive, and authoritative account of the Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects for Canada. The Macdonald Commission is widely recognized as one the most influential public transcripts in the history of Canadian confederation, steering federal decision makers toward both a neoliberal governing paradigm and the continental integration of the Canadian political economy. Gregory Inwood’s careful research and critical insights into the many and complex processes through which consensus is built around public policies, which initially find little support in public opinion, is a major contribution to the study of contemporary Canadian politics. Though an extensive review of academic and popular writing, archival research, discourse analysis, and elite interviews, Continentalizing Canada skillfully reconstructs the story of how free trade became the major plank of Canadian development policy in the late twentieth century in the face of widespread political opposition and ambiguous evidence. This book also represents a definitive contribution to the growing literature that situates ideas and royal commissions as critical structuring mechanisms in Canadian political life.

2005
A.W. Johnson
Dream No Little Dreams: A Biography of the Douglas Government of Saskatchewan, 1944-1961 (University of Toronto Press, 2004)

Excerpt from jury report:
This is an intensely personal account of a remarkable government. Al Johnson was present at the creation, and for nearly two decades after, as the Douglas Government set about not just reforming but revolutionizing Canadian understanding of the meaning of modern government. The Douglas years marked a political transformation in three respects: the creation of an expert bureaucracy, the introduction of universal social policies and the establishment of active and, on balance, profitable federal-provincial fiscal relations.

Reading Dream No Little Dreams creates the sensation that Harold Carter and Lord Carnarvon must have experienced when they broke through into the tomb of Tutankhamon. ‘So this is what it was like!’ Intimate, knowledgeable and scholarly, Johnson’s account of how populist or protest movements evolve when suddenly confronted with the rigours of governing has timeless relevance. In addition, there are insights about the mechanics of provincial politics and policy-making. Mesmeric as the leader was, Johnson makes clear that the Douglas Government was by no means a one-man operation.

Even the story of how this book came to be published is unique, with a senior civil servant going back to rework his forty-year-old dissertation to document a government and movement that has been woefully understudied.

2004
David A. Good (University of Victoria)
The Politics of Public Management: The HRDC Audit of Grants and Contributions (University of Toronto Press, 2003)

Excerpt from jury report:
David Good’s The Politics of Public Management is the product of a happy circumstance in a very unhappy episode in recent Canadian politics. During the first six months of 2000, questions arising from an internal audit conducted by HRDC (Human Resources Development Canada) dominated national politics. Dr. David Good, a career public servant with a Ph D in Public Policy, was an Assistant Deputy Minister in HRDC during the period when his Department was under intense public scrutiny. His book is a superbly written, insightful insider’s account of the story. It provides a close-up look at the trade-offs that are made as the imperatives of the classic system of responsible government give way to those of the New Public Management. It also shows the power of the media both to drive the agenda of those on the inside of government and to create on the outside their own public version of events. Good’s book is a healthy reality check for citizens and political scientists concerned with declining public confidence in democratic governance.

2003
John Borrows (University of Victoria)
Recovering Canada: The Resurgence of Indigenous Law (University of Toronto Press, 2002)

Excerpt from jury report:
John Borrows had a formidable task in writing Recovering Canada: The Resurgence of Indigenous Law. First, in outlining the contribution of traditional aboriginal law to the Common Law in Canada, he had to find a way to make the narrative compelling to those whose interest in legal studies extends beyond standard case law, and into a more esoteric realm. Second, at least for the purpose of this prize, he was obliged to make his argument broadly appealing to political scientists. He succeeded brilliantly on both dimensions. The book constitutes a fascinating journey into a portion of our shared heritage that most Canadians know little about. Recovering Canada should become a staple for students of aboriginal studies and constitutional politics in Canada.

2002
Patrick Macklem (University of Toronto)
Indigenous Differences and the Constitution of Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2001)

Excerpt from jury report:
The book Indigenous Difference and the Constitution of Canada is a landmark study. Professor Patrick Macklem has produced a sweeping account of "indigenous difference", in which he first explores its dimensions and then demonstrates how Aboriginal differences imply distinct indigenous interests, rights and positions in the Canadian constitutional order, an order that itself gains legitimacy by justly accommodating indigenous difference. The book is remarkable for its scope, its deep and thorough research in law, political science, philosophy and history, and its subtle and sophisticated argumentation. It is also distinguished by the author's unbending concern for justice, fairness and equality.

2001
Tom Flanagan (University of Calgary)
First Nations? Second Thoughts (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2000)

2000
David E. Smith (University of Saskatchewan)
The Republican Option in Canada, Past and Present (University of Toronto Press, 1999)

1998
Samuel V. LaSelva (University of British Columbia)
The Moral Foundations of Canadian Federalism (McGill-Queen's University Press, 1996)

1996
Ronald Manzer (University of Toronto)
Public Schools & Political Ideas: Canadian Educational Policy in Historical Perspective (University of Toronto Press, 1994)

1994
Stephen McBride (Simon Fraser University)
Not Working: State, Unemployment, and Neo-Conservatism in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 1992)

1992
Donald J. Savoie (Université de Moncton)
The Politics of Public Spending in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 1990)

Jill Vickers Prize



2016 Short List | 2015 Prize Winner | Previous Winners



Rules 2017

The Canadian Political Science Association proudly announces the thirtheeth competition for the Jill Vickers Prize. The prize was established in honour of Professor Jill Vickers, an activist and a leader in Canadian feminist scholarship, and the author of numerous books and articles in the fields of feminist political science, epistemology and interdisciplinary methodology, feminist theory and movements for change.


  • The Jill Vickers Prize will be awarded to the author or authors of the best paper presented, in English or French, at the 2016 conference of the Canadian Political Science Association on the topic of gender and politics.

  • The annual jury will consists of the Women, Gender, and Politics section head for the conference in which the papers were presented and two other members appointed each fall by the CPSA Board of Directors.

  • The deadline for submission of papers is 15 June 2016.

  • The Prize winner(s) will be announced at the 2017 Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

  • The Prize winner(s) will receive a commemorative plaque.

  • To be considered for the prize, an electronic copy of the paper must be e-mailed directly to each member of the Prize Jury and the office of the CPSA at the addresses provided below and clearly marked JILL VICKERS PRIZE ENTRY.

Canadian Political Science Association - cpsa-acsp@cpsa-acsp.ca
Louise Carbert (Dalhouise) (Chair) - louise.carbert@dal.ca
Gina Comeau (Laurentian) - gscomeau@laurentian.ca
Jacquetta (Jacquie) Newman King’s University College) - jnewman@uwo.ca

__________________________________________________

2016 Short List

Alana Cattapan, “Precarious Labour: On Egg Donation as Work”
Alana Cattapan’s paper is original in its approach and subject matter, looking at reproductive rights and their relationship to labour with a focus on egg donation in Canada. As a temporary, non-standard form of labour, she argues that egg donation destabilizes conventional reproductive relationships; an engagement that may have much in common with other forms of precarious, often exploitative, and gendered labour. Cattapan’s research is carefully laid out and well researched, providing some of the necessary conceptual groundwork in ongoing scholarly and policy discussions about new reproductive technologies and their gendered effects. The paper provides a challenging analysis of the normative issues surrounding egg donation in Canada, opening a discussion for improved governance and regulatory frameworks on the issues at hand.

Scott Pruysers and Julie Blais, “Why Won’t Lola Run? An Experiment Examining Stereotype Threat and Political Ambition”
Pruysers and Blais’ paper makes an important contribution to the literature on the gender gap and political ambition by employing an experimental design in a Canadian university setting. The authors introduce the concept of “stereotype threat” and find that consistent with previous research, a political ambition gap exists between young women and men when they are exposed to negative stereotypes about women’s political abilities. That is, women who are exposed to the threat condition expressed significantly less ambition than women in the non-threat condition. The authors conclude that the gender gap in political ambition is, at least in part, a result of negative stereotypes. The paper provides an innovative, multi-disciplinary approach that makes an important contribution to a growing body of literature on women and politics using experimental methodologies.

Angelia Wagner, Linda Trimble, Shannon Sampert, Daisy Raphael, and Bailey Gerrits, “Gender, Competitiveness and Candidate Prominence in Newspaper Coverage of Canadian Party Leadership Contests, 1975-2012”
Meticulously well-researched and argued, Wagner et al.’s research makes a novel contribution to the study of gender and media in Canada. Using a content analysis over a broad period of time (1975-2012), the paper examines the importance of gender and competitiveness during political party leadership campaigns. The findings indicate that a candidate's media visibility is largely, although not exclusively, regulated by journalistic assessments of a candidate’s actual level of support among voters, donors, and party officials. While gender matters, the authors argue that a candidate's percentage of the vote on the first ballot is more strongly correlated with the degree of prominence in leadership coverage. By attending to campaign effects, the paper pushes our knowledge forward on the subject and makes an important contribution to gendered mediation research.

__________________________________________________

Award Winners


2015
Karen Bird


Karen Bird holding the plaque for the 2015 Jill Vickers Prize. CPSA President’s Dinner - June 3, 2015 - Roof Top Terrace at National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

“Challenges to Intersectional Inclusion: Institutional Dynamics of Ethnic Quotas and their Impact on Ethnic Minority Women" (2014 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Karen Bird’s paper makes a rich and original contribution by bringing together two significant areas of inquiry: ethnic and gender quotas in electoral and representational politics and feminist institutionalist theory. The paper is cogently written, convincingly argued, and ambitious in its methodology, containing an impressive comparative case study of 18 countries where ‘dual’ quotas (gender and race/ethnicity) are in effect. Bird argues that “we need to pay closer attention to intersectionality in the domain of electoral quotas for enhanced political representation of women and ethnic groups.” Her analysis raises questions about the utility of quotas alone to improve the representation of women’s diversity in a variety of contexts, and helps push the quota literature in new and intersectional ways. The study of women, gender and politics is enriched by the paper’s ground-breaking insights and its fertile directions for further research.


2014
Melanee Thomas (University of Calgary) and Lisa Lambert (University of Calgary)
Private Mom vs Political Dad? Communications of Parental Status in the 41st Canadian Parliament (2013 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
In this well-written and expertly presented research which offers fresh insights to the literature, the author’s analyse empirical data which counters much of the previous academic work in women and media which has typically argued that women downplay their parental status and men politicians celebrate their family lives. Indeed, as Thomas and Lambert persuasively argue in this treatment of political marketing, politicians displays of parental status are deliberate and strategic decisions designed to highlight both the candidate’s party’s brand and to shape their own image and political fortunes. They conclude that gender and political party “condition how parental status is communicated to constituents”.


2013
Tracey Raney (Ryerson University)
Leaving Parliament: Gender and Exit in the Ontario Legislature (2012 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
This paper raises a new set of questions for further inquiry and might be regarded as reminiscent of some of Jill Vickers’ earliest work in breaking new ground in what became the Women and Politics field. It fits neatly into the evolution of the Gender and Politics field and is readily comprehensible to a generalist audience. Rates of exits and reasons for exit appear to be a gendered phenomenon. It may be that future research would do well to consider a lifespan approach to political life in its totality to distinguish more systematically the career politician from the incidental politician. In the past political leaders came primarily from the former group, though this too may be changing.


2012
Lois Harder (University Alberta) and Michelle Thomarat (University Alberta)
The Law and the Parent: the Numbers Game of Standing and Status (2011 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Lois Harder and Michelle Thomarat expertly weave together three theoretical lenses to analyze legal jurisprudence surrounding the concepts of ‘parental status’ and ‘standing in place of a parent’. Their paper interrogates the current legal ambivalence concerning the number of formally recognized parents in various circumstances, and convincingly challenges “the heteronormative, monogamous and biological presumptions” underpinning recognized Canadian family structures Harder and Thomarat clearly and logically draw on relevant case law evidence in their analysis to uncover the continued pride of place of the nuclear family, paternal privilege and biology in legal circles. As such, the paper makes a strong case for widening the threshold for parental standing to three (or more) parents instead of the liberal-privacy embedded, two-parent model. Their work ultimately helps break down gendered legal barriers to allow for more diverse inclusions in parental decision-making, particularly those surrounding same-sex relationships.


2011
Melanee Thomas (McGill University)
The Limits of Modernization: Gender, Generation, and Subjective Political Engagement in Canada, 1965-2008 (2010 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
This paper examines a fundamental question in gender and politics research: why do engagement and confidence gaps along gender lines persist, despite large-scale changes that would predict their disappearance? Thomas makes a powerful contribution to the literature with her analyses, for she demonstrates that existing theory is inadequate to account for contemporary gender gaps in the two dimensions. As such, the paper makes a critical contribution to the literature on gender and political behaviour. Thomas’ paper is well written and logically organized, the long time period she analyzes provides a compelling basis for testing her hypotheses, and the data work is impressive.


2010
Maya Eichler (York University)
Russia’s Soldiers’ Mothers: Contesting or Reinforcing Militarized Gender Roles? (2009 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Maya Eichler’s paper takes central concepts of feminist international relations theory and examines them for their utility in explaining the interplay between masculinization, militarization, and a maternalist ideology in two different Russian examples. In examining Mother’s groups in Chechnya and Moscow and St. Petersburg, she shows the various ways these groups have worked in discursive space. In some instances the masculinist-militarization link was weakened and in others not.


2009
Candace Johnson (University of Guelph)
The Political 'Nature' of Pregnancy and Childbirth (2008 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
This paper examines theoretical debates concerning “medicalization” as they are manifested in the increased demand for “natural”childbirth. Many feminist theorists argue that medical intervention in pregnancy and childbirth is unwarranted and disempowering, and devalues women’s abilities and experiences. Criticism of medical intervention is strongest among privileged women, and is expressed as preference for “natural,” “traditional,” or “normal” approaches and practices. Reverence for the natural, Johnson argues, is a political claim that asserts social position, identity, and resistance. She considers this political claim to be demonstrated in a physical and psychic duality, a “split subjectivity,” that is exacerbated by the sharpness of the public-private divide in women’s lives.


2008
Ethel Tungohan (University of Toronto)
Gender and Multiculturalism: Analyzing the Relationship between Multiculturalism, Liberalism and Women’s Rights (2007 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
This paper seeks to revisit questions surrounding the “paradox of multicultural vulnerability” by examining the tensions between liberalism and multiculturalism and between multiculturalism and feminism. It takes a critical look at attempts to reconcile these purported dichotomies, arguing that such attempts mostly either promote contradictory policies or are too removed from political realities to be fully realized. It comes to the conclusion that although compromise is feasible, individual rights should still remain sacrosanct, and it endorses a form of political liberalism that allows for a plurality in cultures and in beliefs, thereby allowing the individual to choose among a myriad of cultural choices.


2007
Paul Kershaw (University of British Columbia)
Changing the Subject: Violence, Care and (In)Active Male Citizenship (2006 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
In this paper, Dr. Kershaw develops a critique of the concept of active citizenship that underlies welfare-to-work programmes whereby women’s caregiving as a mode of active citizenship is discounted. Kershaw’s empirical research also attests to the fact that labour force attachment policies obscure the ways in which men’s behaviours (violence and/or unwillingness to participate in childcare) affect women’s economic status and employment decisions. Welfare policies premised on promoting women’s paid employment need to be expanded to include policies directed at fostering men’s active fatherhood. Kershaw distinguishes his approach from US discourse on fatherhood which, in seeking to reinforce the traditional nuclear family, does not challenge the inequalities of power and responsibility associated with it.

2006
Alexandra Dobrowolsky (Saint Mary’s University) and Ruth Lister (Loughborough University)
Social Exclusion and Changes to Citizenship: Women and Children, Minorities and Migrants in Britain (2006 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
In this paper, Drs. Dobrowolsky and Lister analyze the current state of citizenship in Britain in light of the rise of political discourses and practices that seek to remedy social exclusion. Reviewing the welfare policies and their retrenchment under the leadership of Tony Blair, they unpack the implications of social exclusion in two highly contested areas: 1) recent welfare restructuring; and 2) immigration and asylum. They examine the centerpiece of new Labour’s social exclusion agenda and welfare reform strategy where the figure of ‘the child’ has emerged as a focal point in a changing citizenship regime – ‘the child’ as a citizen-in-becoming and the future citizen-worker. This has serious repercussions for women in general, racial and ethnic minority women as well as imm/migrant women in particular.

2005
Paul Kershaw (University of British Columbia)
Carefair (2004 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
In this paper, Dr. Kershaw brings together key themes from the literature on feminist citizenship theory, as well as the comparative literature on the welfare state and public policy. Starting from the premise that social institutions and policy need to induce more men to shoulder primary care work in addition to other citizenry obligations, he develops a policy reform he terms “carefair.” With specific reference to parental leave in Canada, he illustrates how this reform could be actualized.

2004
Isabelle Fortier (École nationale d'administration publique), Éric Montpetit (Université de Montréal) and Francesca Scala (Concordia University)
Democratic Practices vs. Expertise: the National Action Committee on the Status of Women and Canada’s Policy on Reproductive Technology (2003 CPSA conference paper)

Excerpt from the jury report:
The jury felt that the authors had done an excellent case study of the role of the National Action Committee (NAC) in relation to federal policy-making in the area of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Their analysis of this case study developed important insights about the challenges and contradictions of representation. Organizations, such as NAC, are confronted with the double challenge of representing their members in ways that are democratic, transparent and inclusive while at the same time representing the interests of their members in trying to influence state policy-making. Feminist principles of the importance of women’s experiential knowledge confront the priority given by the State to professional knowledge and expertise. The paper makes an important contribution to our understanding of the interrelations of gender and politics, of the dilemmas of feminist representation, of the strategic challenges to women’s organizations in their relations to their members and to the Canadian state. As the authors write, the case study “illustrates the difficulty of reconciling participatory practices with institutional structures of government that continue to be governed by technocratic principles of expertise, efficiency and control.” In analyzing the tensions, contradictions and dilemmas involved for feminist organizations in their double representation with their members and with the state, the paper by Fortier, Montpetit and Scala merits the Jill Vickers Prize 2004 for carrying on the tradition of insightful scholarship, strategic vision and social pertinence honoured by this Prize.

Prix francophone de l'ACSP



2014 Prize Winner | Previous Winners



Rules 2016

L'Association canadienne de science politique annonce le deuxième concours biennal en vue de la remise du Prix francophone de l'ACSP.


  • L’ACSP décernera le Prix francophone de l’ACSP au meilleur livre de science politique publié en français.

  • Les livres admissibles peuvent avoir été écrits par un seul auteur ou par plusieurs auteurs. Les manuels scolaires, les livres publiés sous la direction d'une personne ou d'une équipe, les collections d'essais, les traductions et les mémoires ne sont pas admissibles.

  • Un livre soumis au Prix francophone de l’ACSP ne peut être soumis à un autre prix de l’ACSP au cours de la même année ou de toute année subséquente.

  • Dans le cas d’un livre ayant un seul auteur, ce dernier doit être un membre de l’ACSP dans l’année où le livre est prix en considération pour le prix. Dans le cas d’un livre ayant plusieurs auteurs, au moins l’un d’entre eux doit être un membre de l’ACSP dans l’année où le livre est pris en considération pour le prix. Dans un cas comme dans l’autre, la cotisation doit parvenir au bureau de l’ACSP à Ottawa avant la date limite fixée pour soumettre les livres.

  • Pour le prix de 2016, la date du copyright du livre devra être 2014 ou 2015.

  • La date limite pour soumettre un livre dans le cadre de ce concours sera le 17 décembre 2015. Les livres publiés entre le 18 décembre et le 31 décembre sont admissibles à la condition que les membres du jury soient informés de la date de l’envoi par la poste.

  • Le nom du lauréat ou de la lauréate sera annoncé lors du Congrès annuel 2016 de l'Association canadienne de science politique.

  • Le lauréat ou la lauréate recevra une plaque commémorative et les livres soumis au secrétariat de l’ACSP pour le prix 2016. S’il y a deux lauréats, ceux-ci partageront les livres.

  • Pour proposer un livre, un exemplaire doit être envoyé directement à chaque membre du jury du prix aux adresses fournies ; un exemplaire doit également être envoyé au bureau de l’ACSP. Un livre peut être soumis par l’auteur (ou les auteurs) ou l’éditeur. Le colis doit être clairement identifié au moyen de la mention LIVRE SOUMIS AU JURY DU PRIX FRANCOPHONE DE L'ACSP.

Jury du Prix francophone de l'ACSP
Association canadienne de science politique
Bureau 204, 260, rue Dalhousie
Ottawa ON K1N 7E4
Canada
613.562.1202

Pascale Dufour
Département de science politique
Université de Montréal
Pavillon Lionel-Groulx, local C-4006
3150, rue Jean-Brillant
Montréal QC H3C 3J7
Canada
514.343.6578

Louis Massicotte
Département de science politique
Université Laval
Pavillon Charles De Koninck, bureau 3449
1030 avenue des Sciences-Humaines
Québec Québec G1V 0A6
Canada
418-656-2407

Geneviève Tellier
École d’études politiques
Pavillon de la Faculté des sciences sociales, pièce FSS7005
120, rue Université
Ottawa Ontario K1N 6N5
Canada
613-562-5754

Award Winners


2014
Pascal Dufour
Trois espaces de protestation. Les Presses de l'Université de Montréal, 2013.

Excerpt from jury report:
Dans Trois espaces de protestation, Pascale Dufour cherche à comprendre comment les débats entourant la mondialisation transforment l’action collective et la politique des partis, des syndicats et du milieu associatif en France, au Canada et au Québec. Théoriquement ambitieux, son ouvrage fournit une analyse systématique et détaillée de ces luttes en les situant historiquement et géographiquement. L’auteure fait une contribution importante à la recherche sur les mouvements sociaux en liant l’analyse des discours et des actions des acteurs collectifs afin de faire ressortir la diversité des pratiques. Dufour illustre de manière convaincante l’utilité de concevoir la mondialisation comme une variable endogène aux sociétés pour explorer les dynamiques et les échelles changeantes de la contestation politique au 21ème siècle. / In Trois espaces de protestation, Pascale Dufour seeks to understand how the globalization debate transforms collective action and policies of parties, unions and the cooperative movement in France, Canada and Québec. Her theoretically ambitious work provides a systematic and detailed analysis of these struggles, situating them historically and geographically. The author makes a major contribution to research on social movements, linking discourse analysis and actions by collective players in order to reveal the diversity of practices. Dufour convincingly illustrates the usefulness of looking at globalization as an endogenous social variable, in order to explore the dynamics and changing scale of political disputes in the 21st century.

CPSA Prize in Comparative Politics



2014 Prize Winner | Previous Winners



Rules 2016

The Canadian Political Science Association announces the fourth biennial competition for the CPSA Prize in Comparative Politics. With this prize, the Canadian Political Science Association seeks to encourage the best scholarship by its members in this field.

  • The CPSA will award the CPSA Prize in Comparative Politics every two years to the best book published in English or in French in the field of Comparative Politics.

  • Eligible books may be single-authored or multi-authored; textbooks, edited books, collections of essays, translations and memoirs are not eligible.

  • A book that has been submitted to the Prize in Comparative Politics cannot be submitted to another CPSA book prize in the same year of in a subsequent year.

  • In the case of a single-authored book, the author must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. In the case of a multi-authored book, at least one of the authors must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. The membership fee, in either of the above cases, must be received at the CPSA office in Ottawa before the prize submission deadline.

  • For the 2016 award, a book must have a copyright date of 2014 or 2015.

  • The deadline for submission of books will be 17 December 2015. Books published between December 18th and December 31srt are eligible, provided that members of the jury are informed of the date of mailing.

  • The Prize winner(s) will be announced at the 2016 Annual Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

  • The Prize winner(s) will receive a commemorative plaque. They will also receive/share the set of books submitted to the CPSA office for the 2016 prize.

  • To nominate a book, a paper copy must be sent directly to each member of the Prize Jury at the addresses provided; a paper copy must also be sent directly to the offices of the CPSA. A book can be submitted by the author(s) or the publisher. Packages must be clearly marked CPSA PRIZE IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS ENTRY.

CPSA Prize in Comparative Politics Jury
Canadian Political Science Association
Suite 204, 260 Dalhousie Street
Ottawa ON K1N 7E4
Canada
613.562.1202


Francesco Cavatorta
928, rue Eymard
Québec Québec G1S 4A1
Canada
581-777-5331

Aude-Claire Fourot
Department of Political Science
Simon Fraser University
888 University Drive
Burnbaby British Columbia V5A 1S6
Canada
778-782-4293

Achim Hurrelmann
Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
Carleton University
3305 River Building
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa Ontario K1S 2J8
613-520-2888


Award Winners


2014
Dietlind Stolle and Michele Micheletti
Political Consumerism (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Dietland Stolle and Michele Micheletti’s Political Consumerism breaks new ground in the empirical exploration and analysis of “political consumerism”, a form of political participation by which consumers use ethically and value-driven market choices to change institutional or market practices. Through compelling mixed methods, Stolle and Micheletti demonstrate its increasing importance and significance as an emerging form of individualized responsibility-taking and social action. Consumers use a variety of new forms, particularly suited to the digital age, to exercise pressure on corporations and governments. Collectivized individual actions are expressed through such measures as “buycotts”, labeling schemes, or anti-sweatshop campaigns. The book shows, among others, the effects of an email exchange campaign against Nike, as well as the impact of fair trade labeling and organic food activism. Stolle and Micheletti have gathered an impressive amount and different types of data, and have developed ingenious analytical strategies. They are careful and balanced in their assertions on the significance and consequences of political consumerism, and they engage seriously with potential critics. This original book advances intriguing and fascinating claims that are well demonstrated and supported.

2012
Lisa Vanhala
Making Rights a Reality? Disability Rights Activists and Legal Mobilization (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Lisa Vanhala’s Making Rights a Reality? Disability Rights Activists and Legal Mobilization (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011) makes a major theoretical contribution to our understanding of the politics of disability rights, the judicialization of politics, and social movement theory. Vanhala presents a strong argument for “why, when and how some groups are more likely than others to rely on litigation strategy as part of their overall logic of action.” (p.9) Rather than resources or political opportunities, she argues that the broader institutional environment affects the frames and actions they choose. In short, ideas and collective identity matter. Using a sociological-institutional approach, she develops a rich in-depth analysis based in extensive interview data. The book compares the cases of Canada and the UK.

2010
Pablo Policzer
The Rise & Fall of Repression in Chile (Notre Dame University Press, 2009)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Pablo Policzer’s The Rise & Fall of Repression in Chile (Notre Dame University Press, 2009) asks a Weberian question: how is coercion controlled and used by authoritarian states? To explain variations over time in the use of coercion in Chile under the Pinochet dictatorship, Policzer distinguishes between two types of monitoring of agents: external and internal. A principal-agent theory is used to reconstruct the history of coercion in the Chilean state drawing on original archival research. Policzer shows how improvements in internal and external monitoring brought the coercive apparatus under greater control within the regime, and thereby reduce the personal power of Pinochet.

CPSA Prize for Teaching Excellence


2014 Prize Winner | Previous Winners


Rules 2016

The Canadian Political Science Association announces the fourth biennial competition for the Excellence in Teaching Prize to recognize the contributions of political scientists to excellence in teaching and student learning.

  • Eligibility:

    Nominees must teach at a Canadian university, be members of the CPSA, and have taught as primary instructors on a full time basis for at least five years. Award recipients may not receive the award more than once.

    Candidates can self-nominate or be nominated by any CPSA members who are familiar with the candidate’s teaching, including departmental chairs and departmental faculty colleagues. In the latter case, the nominator must fill out a nomination form and have the nomination accepted by the nominee.


  • Format nomination packages as follows:

    Nomination packages must be typed in Times Roman 11 font, single spaced with strict adherence to the maximum page limits noted below. The nomination package will include, in the order that follows:

  • 1. A CV outlining key accomplishments as a researcher and teacher (five pages maximum).

    2. A statement that characterizes the nominee’s teaching philosophy, connecting this to specific discussion of effective innovation in teaching practices, and/or effective teaching and learning leadership and/or contributions to the scholarship of teaching and learning (two pages maximum).

    3. A one-page table listing all courses taught by the nominee in each of the last five years.

    4. A copy of the teaching evaluation tool.

    5. Full evaluation data (including complete student comments) for two courses preferably of different grade levels.

    6. A letter of support from the nominee’s department chair or, alternatively, from any one of the nominee’s departmental colleagues (2 pages maximum).

    7. Letters from three former students that discuss how the nominee’s teaching shaped their learning, perspective, and career trajectory (2 pages maximum each).

    8. Appendices with evidence to support the criteria listed below and which may include scholarship of teaching and learning, evidence of teaching awards, evaluation of teaching workshops, etc.

    9. A statement summarizing key achievements related to teaching (optional).


    The prize jury will adjudicate the prize based on the following criteria:

    a. Evidence of excellence in teaching normally over the most recent five years during which the faculty member assumed a full teaching load at the undergraduate and graduate level (where graduate programs exist). This requirement does not assume that all nominees have taught a full load in the last five years prior to submission of the nomination package, rather requires evidence of excellence in teaching over the most recent five years during which the faculty member assumed a full load.

    b. Evidence of commitment to the improvement of university teaching and student learning, with emphasis on contributions to the discipline.

    c. Evidence of effective innovation in teaching practices and/or

    d. Evidence of effective teaching and learning leadership and/or

    e. Evidence of commitment to the scholarship of teaching and learning.


  • The deadline for submissions is 1 March 2016.


  • The Prize winner will be announced at the 2016 Annual Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.


  • The Prize winner will receive a commemorative plaque.


  • To nominate an individual, a copy of the package must be emailed directly to each member of the prize jury at the email addresses provided below; a copy must also be emailed directly to the CPSA Secretariat. It is the nominees’ responsibility to provide a paper copy if required by any of the jurors. Packages must be clearly marked CPSA TEACHING EXCELLENCE PRIZE ENTRY.

Canadian Political Science Association
cpsa-acsp@cpsa-acsp.ca
Renan Levine, University of Toronto Scarborough
renan.levine@utoronto.ca
J.P. Lewis, University of New Brunswick
jp.lewis@unb.ca
Alison Smith, Université de Montréal
alison.maryann.smith@gmail.com


Award Winners


2014
Mark Salter, University of Ottawa

Excerpt from the jury report:
Dr. Mark Salter is an exceptional teacher. He seeks to support students in their learning through an emphasis on skill building and 'learning-by-doing' and he regularly creates innovative assignments that make use of new learning technologies. He has created classroom spaces designed for discovery. Dr. Salter is also leader in the promotion of teaching and learning excellence and has given presentations on his teaching practices at both the national and the international level, is active in professional development through both the Canadian Political Science Association and the International Studies Association and has actively engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning.

2012
Heather Smith, University of Northern British Columbia

Excerpt from the jury report:
Heather Smith’s entire application exudes her passion for teaching. This passion is substantiated by previous administrative teaching and learning positions, numerous awards to date including the prestigious National 3M Teaching Award and an interactive teaching approach, inspired by critical feminist philosophy. Heather Smith demonstrates a profound familiarity with research on pedagogy, and a real effort to integrate this into not only her teaching practices, but also into her teaching development activities. Heather Smith’s contribution to teaching goes beyond the experiences she provides for her students but also to the wider academic community not only through workshops and conference presentations but also through scholarship on teaching and learning.

2010
J. Marshall Beier, McMaster University

Excerpt from the jury report:
J. Marshall Beier is clearly an exceptional teacher of global politics. His courses are intellectually ambitious and cohesive, as well as clear about learning goals and evaluation criteria. He creates excitement in his classrooms, and his approach is striking in the extent to which it not only respects students but treats them as full intellectual agents. In his Innovation in Arms Control Project, a final year seminar, he supports students in collaboratively producing their own scholarship, which is published in a Working Paper series he has created; these research products feed into a third year class, and simulations in the third year class in turn inform research in the fourth year seminar. His students’ letters reflect not only their appreciation for his teaching, but the extent to which his courses, his mentoring, and his example shaped the development of their goals and careers.

C.B. Macpherson Prize



2014 Prize Winner | Previous Winners



Rules 2016

The Canadian Political Science Association announces the twelfth biennial competition for the C.B. Macpherson Prize. The prize was established to honour the life and work of Crawford Brough Macpherson (1911-1987), an internationally renowned teacher and scholar of political theory who served as University Professor at the University of Toronto. The Canadian Political Science Association seeks to encourage the ideals of scholarship represented by this great Canadian political scientist.


  • The CPSA will award the C.B. Macpherson Prize every two years to the best book published in English or in French in the field of political theory.

  • Eligible books may be single-authored or multi-authored; textbooks, edited books, collections of essays, translations and memoirs are not eligible.

  • A book that has been submitted to the C.B. Macpherson Prize cannot be submitted to another CPSA book prize in the same year or in a subsequent year.

  • In the case of a single-authored book, the author must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. In the case of a multi-authored book, at least one of the authors must be a member of the CPSA in the year the book is considered for the prize. The membership fee, in either of the above cases, must be received at the CPSA office in Ottawa before the prize submission deadline.

  • For the 2016 award, a book must have a copyright date of 2014 or 2015.

  • The deadline for submission of books will be 17 December 2015. Books published between December 18th and December 31srt are eligible, provided that members of the jury are informed of the date of mailing.

  • The Prize winner(s) will be announced at the 2016 Annual Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association.

  • The Prize winner(s) will receive a commemorative plaque. They will also receive/share the set of books submitted to the CPSA office for the 2016 prize.

  • To nominate a book, a paper copy must be sent directly to each member of the Prize Jury at the addresses provided; a paper copy must also be sent directly to the offices of the CPSA. A book can be submitted by the author(s) or the publisher. Submissions must be clearly marked C.B. MACPHERSON PRIZE ENTRY.

C.B. Macpherson Prize Jury
Canadian Political Science Association
Suite 204, 260 Dalhousie Street
Ottawa ON K1N 7E4
Canada
613.562.1202


Steven Lecce
Department of Political Studies
University of Manitoba
531 Fletcher Argue
Winnipeg Manitoba R3T 5V5
Canada
204-474-8403

Augustin Simard
Département de science politique
Université de Montréal
Pavillon Lionel-Groulx, local C-4006
3150, rue Jean-Brillant
Montréal Québec H3C 3J7
Canada
514-343-6578

Joanne Wright
Department of Political Science
University of New Brunswick
Tilley Hall, Room 219, College Hill
Fredericton New Brunswick E3B 5A3
Canada
506-453-4826

Award Winners


2014
Joseph H. Carens
The Ethics of Immigration (Oxford University Press, 2013)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Joseph Carens’ The Ethics of Immigration is arguably the most substantial and enlightening discussion of the normative issues raised by international immigration available. Using the contextual normative analysis that he pioneered in his earlier work, Carens here offers a nuanced discussion of the rights and duties of various categories of migrants and of the receiving communities. Also contributing to an ideal theory of immigration, Carens rearticulates his controversial yet path-breaking argument in favor of open borders: that is, the free movement of people across the world. Carens’ treatise exemplifies how political theory can guide us through both our difficult political problems and our more fundamental meditation on the demands of social justice.

2012
Jennifer Nedelsky (University of Toronto)
Law’s Relations (Oxford University Press, 2011)

Excerpt from the jury report:
An extraordinarily ambitious, interdisciplinary and innovative work, Law’s Relation argues that we must reconceptualize the very idea of autonomy in law if our legal and political systems are to live up to their stated commitments. Challenging the dominant tendency to interpret autonomy in individualistic and boundary-assigning ways, this work develops a contending concept of relational autonomy in compelling and new ways. Equally importantly, it analyzes a wealth of empirical cases and demonstrates that the consistent application of the idea of relational autonomy in legal reasoning would safeguard and enhance relational autonomy in ways that our current notions of autonomy cannot. A remarkable book and a defining statement, it should resonate not only in many academic fields of study, but also in the practice of law.


2010
James Tully (University of Victoria)
Public Philosophy in a New Key (Cambridge University Press, 2008)

Excerpt from the jury report:
James Tully’s two-volume work argues for the democratically engaged role of public philosophy. A new, fresh and clear synthesis of his previous work on the history of Western political thought, colonialism and post-colonialism, modern constitutionalism, and indigenous peoples, Tully’s book advances an inspiring project that stresses the need for public philosophy to enter into dialogue with citizens engaged in struggles against various forms of injustice and oppression. Public philosophy can throw a critical light on the field of practices in which civic struggles take place and the practices of civic freedom available to change them. The focus upon relationships of normativity and power, and the need to bring them into the light of public scrutiny thanks to the particular academic skills available to the researchers, make public philosophy ‘in a new key’ distinctively democratic. The breadth and depth of the work, combined with Tully’s focus on civic freedom and the possibility of the reciprocal elucidation of academic work and citizens’ democratic struggles, make it a major and truly inspiring contribution to contemporary political theory.


2008
Monique Deveaux (Williams College)
Gender and Justice in Multicultural Liberal States (Oxford University Press, 2006)

Excerpt from the jury report:
Monique Deveaux’s Gender and Justice in Multicultural Liberal State deepens our understanding of the challenges faced by liberal states when they hold competing commitments to cultural rights and sexual equality. Deveaux’s construction of these tensions combines a rigorous examination not only of the current literature, but also of cases in South Africa, Canada, and Britain. Her approach is unabashedly political. She argues that although we can and should understand these tensions ethically, psychologically, sociologically, and legally, our responses should focus on frameworks for democratic negotiation and deliberation, as well as the conditions under which individuals affected by these conflicts gain the capacity to participate in negotiating them. Deveaux grounds her approach to democratic legitimacy in norms of political inclusion and democratic dialogue. She understands the spaces of democracy broadly, encompassing not only the formal institutions of democracy, but also the range of informal democratic activities that occur in the private and social spheres. The committee was deeply impressed with the thoroughness and rigour of the argument, and believes that Deveaux’s book solidly and creatively advances what has become a distinctively Canadian school of thought about the nature and practices of liberal multicultural societies.

2006
L.W. Sumner (University of Toronto)
The Hateful and the Obscene: Studies in the Limits of Free Expression (University of Toronto Press, 2004)

Excerpt from the jury report:
In The Hateful and the Obscene, L.W. Sumner develops an original theory of free expression and applies it to the leading cases of obscenity and hate literature in Canada. The theory, drawing on elements from J.S. Mill (his consequentialism and the harm principle), is developed with great care and clarity, and is then used as a framework in analyzing the leading Canadian judicial decisions on pornography and hate propaganda. In this way, Sumner is able to situate – and assess – the legal decisions and reasonings by reference to fundamental philosophical principles concerning free expression. These analyses are comprehensive and powerful – illuminating the judicial decisions and sometimes criticizing them. This book is brilliantly original and will come to be recognized as a major work in the philosophical literature on free expression.

2004
Duncan Ivison (University of Toronto)
Postcolonial Liberalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)

Excerpt from the jury report:
In Postcolonial Liberalism Duncan Ivison explores the challenges to liberal understandings of justice, citizenship, and democracy posed by the situation and the demands of indigenous peoples in contemporary democracies. Weaving together discussions of theorists as disparate as Rawls and Habermas on the one hand and Foucault and Said on the other, Ivison argues for a version of liberal theory that is pluralistic, open, and sensitive to the claims of local contexts but that still aspires to principled generality. Displaying a mastery of a remarkably wide range of works, Ivison produces an analysis that is subtle and sophisticated. He illustrates in his own discussions the kind of open-minded listening to others that he advocates. This is a distinguished contribution to the literature of contemporary political theory.

2002
Joseph Carens (University of Toronto)
Culture, Citizenship, and Community. A Contextual Exploration of Justice as Evenhandedness (Oxford University Press, 2000)

Excerpt from the jury report:
The committee said of Joseph Carens that his book is comparable with the best international scholarship on the subject of citizenship and community, and contributes significantly to that scholarship through its attention to, and development of, ideas of context and evenhandedness. It demonstrates a subtlety and refinement of argumentation, engaging with and distilling a number of distinct theoretical positions. It combines theoretical depth with contextual sensitivity. Part of its subtlety lies in its grasp of concrete particular instances, showing how these particulars can enrich theoretical discussion by revealing hidden conceptual ambiguities. The committee agrees that this is a remarkable book, original and wide-ranging, whose importance will be recognised well beyond the discipline.

2000
Alan Patten (McGill University)
Hegel's Idea of Freedom (Oxford University Press, 1999)

1998
Richard Vernon (University of Western Ontario)
The Career of Toleration (McGill-Queen's University Press, 1997)

1996
Will Kymlicka (University of Ottawa)
Multicultural Citizenship (Oxford University Press, 1995)

1994
Ronald Beiner (University of Toronto)
What's the Matter with Liberalism? (University of California Press, 1992)